Elisabeth Kübler-Ross Biography

Elisabeth-Kübler-Ross-Virginia-Farm-1987

Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, Virginia Farm, 1987

Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, M.D. (July 8, 1926 – August 24, 2004) was a Swiss-born psychiatrist, a pioneer in Near-death studies and the author of the groundbreaking book On Death and Dying (1969), where she first discussed what is now known as the Kübler-Ross model. In this work she proposed the now famous Five Stages of Grief™ as a pattern of adjustment. These five stages of grief are: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. In general, individuals experience most of these stages, though in no defined sequence, after being faced with the reality of their impending death. The five stages have since been adopted by many as applying to the survivors of a loved one’s death, as well.She is a 2007 inductee into the National Women’s Hall of Fame.  She was the recipient of twenty honorary degrees and by July 1982 had taught, in her estimation, 125,000 students in death and dying courses in colleges, seminaries, medical schools, hospitals, and social-work institutions. In 1970, she delivered the The Ingersoll Lectures on Human Immortality at the University of Harvard, on the theme, On Death and Dying.

Declaration and Call-to-Action on Palliative Care & COVID-19

Witnessing, with the rest of the world, the overwhelming physical, social, emotional and spiritual suffering COVID-19 is inflicting on infected persons and their families globally;

Recognizing that palliative care is aimed at prevention and management of serious health-related suffering;

Observing with great concern that the persons infected with COVID-19 are isolated from their families, and may never see them again;

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